English Paper Piecing vs. Paper Piecing

One of our comments from WEEK #4 of our SewAlong asked Pati about the difference between English Paper Piecing and Paper Piecing.

“There is always a little confusion with this:

In English Paper Piecing-is a hands on sewing method –no sewing machine required.   Working with paper templates that are die cut from card stock in specific shapes and measurements like hexagons, diamonds, triangles etc…   fabric is cut little larger than the template all around –(I usually cut a generous  ¼”)   then hand stitched around the shape thru the paper  (or new glue pen method is being used a lot).   Then the fabric shapes are whip-stitched together to create you block design like Grandmother’s Flower Garden, Stars etc…  The beauty in English Paper Piecing is always the accuracy of the finished design and the hand work which is I love.  Watch out – very addicting for some.

Paper Piecing is sometimes confused with Foundation Piecing.  In Paper Piecing a design is printed or drawn on paper.   Fabric is placed on top of the paper design and stitched thru paper and fabric to create the design (usually using a sewing machine) after the blocks are sewn together the paper is torn off.  With Foundation Piecing –usually a light weight fabric is used and similar to Paper Piecing a design it can be printed or drawn on to the fabric or Crazy Quilt method where you just piece as you go but in all cases the base fabric is left in place.

Of course there are many other references for “paper piecing” –freeze paper, parchment paper etc..  This is just my spin on it.”

It’s WEEK #4 of the Marcus Sew-Along!

Hi, I’m Pati Violick.  As the Director of Marketing for Marcus Fabrics, I am very excited to be participating in our Sew Along. “Sew”, a little about me – I enjoy creating, and I especially love making little girls dresses for Quilt Market as well as making quilts. Those who know me well know these 3 things:

1. My husband calls me “Miss Ivory or Miss Beige”. Yes, it’s hard to believe since I work with color & prints on a daily basis, that everything else in my life falls into the neutral category including clothes, decor, even my dog Scout is a beautiful shade of taupe (and yes “taupe” is my favorite color!), although I certainly like all shades of grey & basic black too.

2. One of my favorite pastimes is English Paper Piecing. I have “thousands”of Pieces, (well maybe many, many 100’s) in all shapes, sizes and colors. I actually use some for special gifts like purses, small quilts or embellishments but, the majority of them are beautifully arrayed in baskets, boxes & pretty containers. Truth is, some are just to pretty to do anything with.

3. Last but not least – I come from a big family; I am the oldest of 8. I have been very fortunate in my job here at Marcus to forge new relationships, working with so many wonderful people here in our NY office & designers that have all become part of my family.

 

OK  — no surprise, my giveaway this week is all of the above: A stunning assortment of 8 fat quarters in my favorite colors with some wonderful paper pieces.  Now, on to Block #4 of the Sew-Along:

Cutting Instructions:

Light print  (1038-0188)  *Cut (6) 2⅞” squares; crosscut (4) once diagonally.
Black print  (1035-0112)  *Cut (4) 1¾” squares.
Green print   (1702-0116)  *Cut (4) 1¾” x 3⅝” rectangles.
Blue print   (1109-0150)   *Cut (2) 2⅞” squares.
Cheddar print   (1033-0128)  *Cut (2) 2½” squares.
Red print   (1034-0111)  *Cut (2) 2½” squares.

Directions:

*Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of the (2) cheddar 2½” squares.  Match each with a 2½” red print square.
*Sew ¼” on each side of the drawn line; cut apart.
Pblock1

*Press to the red triangle.  You will have (4) Half Square Triangles measuring 2⅛” unfinished.

*Trim each Half Square Triangle to 2 1/16” by simply placing two edges of the Half Square in between the 2” and the 2⅛” mark on the ruler as shown.  pblockcomp1

*Sew the Half Square Triangles into a Pinwheel; press for opposing seams. The Pinwheel should measure 3⅝” unfinished.

*Arrange the Pinwheel, (4) black print 1¾” squares, and (4) green print 1¾” x 3⅝” rectangles as shown.

*Sew into rows; press to the green rectangles.  Sew rows together; press.
Your center unit should measure 6⅛” unfinished.pblock5*Using the 2⅞” light and blue print squares, make (4) Half Square Triangles using the same method as described previously. Half Square Triangles should measure 2½” unfinished.

*Sew (2) light print triangles to each side of a blue & light print Half Square Triangle unit; press to the light print triangles.  Make (4) units.pblockcomp2

*You’ll sew the big triangle units to the center square next.  To aid in this endeavor, finger press a fold (wrong sides together, just near the raw edge) in the center square to easily find the middle of the block.
pblockcomp3
Fold the light print triangle unit in half (right sides together) and finger press.  Match the finger pressed creases in each unit and pin.

*Sew each of the triangle units to the center square block; press to the triangle units.

Your block should measure 8½” unfinished.

pblock12Download the PDF version

A Visit to the NY Historical Society…Quilts on Display!

Road trip!  A local one, anyway…Marcus Retail Division president Stephanie Dell ‘Olio and Pati Violick, Director of Marketing, recently took in the exhibition Homefront & Battlefield – Quilts & Contest in the Civil War.   Photography of the quilts was not allowed, but these quilt images and details were graciously shared with us by Diane Fagan Affleck, Consulting Curator of the exhibit.

NYHS sign

The exhibit runs through August 24, 2014.  Details

Botanical Album Quilt, 1859 Made by Esther Matthews (1776–1866) for Addison Blair Martz (1834–63) Virginia Cotton; pieced, appliquéd, quilted The rhetoric of secession created conflicts for Southerners whose loyalties were torn between state and country. Esther Mathews placed 23 flowers native to her Virginia home around a “Tree of Liberty” with 30 apples. (There were 30 states between 1848 and 1851.) Did Esther make the quilt to express her loyalties during the crisis of 1850? Did she give it to her grandson Addison to remind him of those sentiments? Addison enlisted in the Confederate army. He died of wounds received at the battle of Chancellorsville. Virginia Quilt Museum, Harrisonburg, VA, 2006.001.001

Botanical Album Quilt, 1859
Made by Esther Matthews (1776–1866)
for Addison Blair Martz (1834–63)
Virginia
Cotton; pieced, appliquéd, quilted
The rhetoric of secession created conflicts for
Southerners whose loyalties were torn between state
and country. Esther Mathews placed 23 flowers native
to her Virginia home around a “Tree of Liberty” with
30 apples. (There were 30 states between 1848 and
1851.) Did Esther make the quilt to express her loyalties
during the crisis of 1850? Did she give it to her grandson
Addison to remind him of those sentiments?
Addison enlisted in the Confederate army. He died of
wounds received at the battle of Chancellorsville.
Virginia Quilt Museum, Harrisonburg, VA, 2006.001.001

Pictorial Quilt, 1861–65 Attributed to Emily L. Wiley Munroe Lynnfield, Massachusetts Wool and cotton; pieced, appliquéd, embroidered Emily Munroe watched four of her six brothers enlist in the Union army: Daniel and Joseph together in the infantry, then Charles and 16-year-old Zachary in a cavalry unit. Many women like Emily who sent loved ones to war suspected that their suffering was one more emotion that knew no sectional boundaries, but was a bond common to North and South. In the end, unlike so many others, Emily could rejoice. All four of her brothers came home. New England Quilt Museum, Lowell, MA, 2000.2 Phoro: Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project

Pictorial Quilt, 1861–65
Attributed to Emily L. Wiley Munroe
Lynnfield, Massachusetts
Wool and cotton; pieced, appliquéd, embroidered  Emily Munroe watched four of her six brothers enlist in the Union army: Daniel and Joseph together in the infantry, then Charles and 16-year-old Zachary in a cavalry unit. Many women like Emily who sent loved ones to war suspected that their suffering was one more emotion that knew no sectional boundaries, but was a bond common to North and South. In the end, unlike so many others, Emily could rejoice. All four of her brothers came home.
New England Quilt Museum, Lowell, MA, 2000.2
Photo: Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project

 

 

 

 

 

photo (6)Here’s Stephanie with Abe Lincoln…”He was a little stiff…”

It’s Quilt Market Time Again!

QM-SP14-QuiltsOnWall

DecoupageChair-AmerBouquetThat hectic season when all the behind-the-scenes prep takes place, resulting in the beautiful, well-oiled machine that is our Quilt Market Booth!  Almost daily, new made-up items arrive here in the office for the booth display.  Here’s a peek at some projects using PRIMO PLAIDS – CHRISTMAS, AMERICAN BOUQUET, and AUNT GRACE TIES ONE ON, from left to right.  (We’ll follow up with Pati for specific pattern info on these projects later — judging from how quickly she’s racing thru the halls, clearly now is not the time… We look forward to seeing all of our quilt shop owner customers and associates in Pittsburgh, May 15-18.

On the Road with Pati!

This week, our Director of Marketing & Advertising, Pati Violick, happily escaped the unpredictable east coast weather, venturing out to sunny CA for a road trip with sales rep Norbert Kaufman.  Here’s a peek at what she found…

First, a visit with Michelle of Fat Quarters Quilt Shop in Vista, CA (shown here with Norbert).  Pretty displays incuded a hexie quilt (a Pati Violick favorite!), crocheted creatures, and fabric bolts from brights to deep darks!

Pati1Next stop: Temecula Quilt Co. in Temecula, CA, where charming miniatures (another Pati fave), a colorful Dear Jane, and one of our finalists in the Just Judie competition were beautifully displayed…Big Judie fans here at Temecula!

Pati2 If you’re in the area, stop by to see the latest Marcus collections, or visit them online! Pati, wishing you safe travels back to NY, where we’re battling brand-new snow and ice…on second thought, you might want to visit a few more shops out there first!

Judie Rothermel Comes to Little Quilts!

As part of our Just Judie quilt competition prize package, the quilt shop sponsoring the most entries was rewarded with a visit from Judie herself!  So, on Friday, November 1, Judie (accompanied by her Marcus Fabrics entourage) arrived at Little Quilts in Marietta, GA for an afternoon of festivities.

LQ6-shopLQ7-sign

(l. to r.: Stephanie Dell 'Olio, President, Marcus Fabrics' Retail Division; Mary ellen vonHolt, shop owner; Judie Rothermel; Pati Violick, Marcus Fabrics' Director of Marketing

(l. to r.): Stephanie Dell ‘Olio, President, Marcus Fabrics’ Retail Division; Mary Ellen vonHolt, owner, Little Quilts; Judie Rothermel; Pati Violick, Marcus Fabrics’ Director of Marketing

LQ2 LQ3

Judie enjoys a close look at some of the finalists...

Judie enjoys a close look at some of the finalists…

LQ8-Marty LQ9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

...and one entry that was completed after the deadline. Miniature hexies, anyone?

…and one entry that was completed after the deadline. Miniature hexies, anyone?

With an impressive 24 entries sponsored, Little Quilts owner Mary Ellen VonHolt proudly hosted the special event — part meet-and-greet, part trunk show – for an excited group of contestants, customers and guests.  Mary Ellen and Judie showed some of her own quilts, and attendees left with goodies including Judie’s tips for creating with miniatures, and much more! …As they say, a wonderful time was had by all!  Congratulations again to Little Quilts and its entrants on a job beautifully done.